31.
 
2 points by kas 3 months, 2 weeks ago | discuss | parent | on: Could Nim Replace Python?
No sweat, take your time.
32.
 
2 points by gonational 3 months, 2 weeks ago | 2 comments | on: Could Nim Replace Python?
As a long-term python developer with basically no experience in compiled languages, I can tell you that Nim being a compiled language does not turn me off, and I really like the syntax. Being a compiled language would turn me off if it didn‚Äôt come with a lot of speed improvement, but the speed is drastically better than cPython. The reason why I will probably never give the language more than a moment of thought is because there is basically no ecosystem. The language has been around for longer than Rust and Go, yet it has basically 1 half-baked web framework. I didn‚Äôt see much in regards to any specific other niches either, besides meta-programming. I can tell you right now that if If I looked up ‚ÄúNim web frameworks‚ÄĚ or ‚ÄúNim ORMs‚ÄĚ and found a bunch of blog posts and libraries, I would be spending the next two months, solid, learning and using the language.
33.
 
2 points by sebst 3 months, 2 weeks ago | 1 comment | parent | on: Could Nim Replace Python?
No, I hope to add some features in the next time, but I’m a bit underwater with client projects at the moment
34.
 
2 points by sebst 3 months, 2 weeks ago | discuss | on: my faq
You can! Just put ‚ÄúAsk PN:‚ÄĚ in front of your submission and use the text field for whatever you like to ask!
35.
 
1 point by kas 3 months, 2 weeks ago | 1 comment | parent | on: Could Nim Replace Python?
Ok, so there's now way to make paragraphs here on PN?
36.
 
1 point by kas 3 months, 2 weeks ago | 3 comments | on: Could Nim Replace Python?
Betteridge's law of headlines is an adage that states: ‚ÄúAny headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no.‚ÄĚ Speed or not, I believe that Python's interactive prompt + being able to run without compilation gives Python a head start. Nim looks interesting, though.
37.
 
1 point by SteveSvatek 3 months, 2 weeks ago | discuss | on: Social Networks
ok
38.
 
1 point by ish 3 months, 3 weeks ago | discuss | parent | on: Alpine makes Python Docker builds 50× slower, and images 2× larger
In my experience, alpine's use of musl instead of glibc cost about a 30% performance hit on my csv processing workloads.
39.
 
1 point by garettmd 3 months, 4 weeks ago | 1 comment | on: Alpine makes Python Docker builds 50× slower, and images 2× larger
I would take this guy's take with a grain of salt. He's selling tools for creating Docker containers for Python. And some of the methods he uses aren't conducive to creating the best Docker images. See HN post for more discussion
40.
 
1 point by ish 3 months, 4 weeks ago | discuss | on: python 3.9 compatibility changes
Thanks for the heads up. I checked my work projects with -Werror and all I needed to do was update pytest.
41.
 
1 point by hoistbypetard 4 months, 1 week ago | discuss | on: Ultimate Setup for Your Next Python Project
You might be interested in adapting this template into a cookiecutter template[1]. That's my favorite way to start a new project, by far. This[2] is my current favorite one for new python projects. [1](https://cookiecutter.readthedocs.io/en/latest/) [2](https://github.com/wemake-services/wemake-python-package)
42.
 
-1 points by admin123 4 months, 2 weeks ago | discuss | on: Programming language of 2019? Python beaten by trusty old C
231
43.
 
1 point by kas 4 months, 3 weeks ago | discuss | parent | on: How to Read a File in Python, Write to, plus Append, to a File
(It didn't, damn!)
44.
 
1 point by kas 4 months, 3 weeks ago | 1 comment | on: How to Read a File in Python, Write to, plus Append, to a File
In an article that talks about handling files, I feel that `pathlib` should have been mentioned: import pathlib path = pathlib.Path('/path/to/file') with path.open('w') as fptr: print('oh, hai!', file=fptr) (I wonder if identing the block above renders the block as a code block…)
45.
 
1 point by twillin 4 months, 4 weeks ago | discuss | on: Social Networks
Possible, yes. However you may decide that adding more technologies for specific parts of the application result in better usage of resources (time, money, etc). ex1: You could build your frontend using Django's rendering framework, but you may decide that it would be better to use a different rendering framework or even an api and separate frontend. ex2: You could store all your user-uploaded files on disk with Django, or you may opt to use an external service like AWS S3 or GCP GSB for those files.
46.
 
4 points by mumi 5 months ago | discuss | on: Social Networks
I think there's a need for other technologies as well.
47.
 
2 points by epicserve 5 months, 1 week ago | discuss | on: Kite, Now for Spyder IDE
So what is the catch? Why is it free? How are they able to pay for all their developers? https://kite.com/careers/ It does say, "Kite runs locally. Your code is private." However, I'm still left wondering how they are paying for their developers. My guess is that they're selling analytics or they just have a bunch of investors and are trying to build a team to pivot eventually and do something else that makes money eventually.
48.
 
2 points by kas 5 months, 3 weeks ago | discuss | parent | on: A powerful modal editor written in python.
Thanks! I didn't look in the source code, but I _did_ look in the documentation and I didn't find anything (I can't be absolutely sure I didn't overlook it, though). (Shift|Ctrl)-Esc is not exactly intuitive. Neither is my current editor's (jed) exit combo, ^X^C, but at least it's documented.
49.
 
3 points by rjmorris 5 months, 3 weeks ago | 1 comment | parent | on: A powerful modal editor written in python.
LOL. If you're still stuck inside your vy window, I found the key combo in the source code: Shift-Esc to quit or Ctrl-Esc to save and quit.
50.
 
1 point by kas 5 months, 3 weeks ago | 2 comments | on: A powerful modal editor written in python.
So, how do you exit this thing? Asking for a friend.
51.
 
1 point by intrepidhero 5¬†months, 3¬†weeks ago | discuss | on: uuid ‚ÄĒ UUID objects according to RFC 4122 ‚ÄĒ Python 3.8.0 documentation
Here's a question (maybe a dumb one) for the python crowd: why should I use a dedicated uuid algorithm versus `id(myObj)`?
52.
 
1 point by kas 5 months, 4 weeks ago | discuss | on: Thermal testing Raspberry Pi 4
Excuse me, but how is this relevant for Pythonic News? The word ‚Äėpython‚Äô does not appear even once in the entire article and the package `stress-ng` does not list python as a dependency. If you want positive karma, please post at Lobsters or HN instead.
53.
 
1 point by abrookins 6 months ago | discuss | parent | on: New Book: The Temple of Django Database Performance
3.8 months - that's a fresh baby! :) Ours just turned six months and decided to get up at 4 am today, as usual. Thanks for buying the book! Agreed on there not being much written on the topic -- and in general, most programming books I read seem to be either too basic, or else just contain high-level overviews of advanced topics. There must be a good reason this happens to books, but whatever it is, I'd like to address it by writing focused books on advanced topics. Anyway, thank you for the feedback! I questioned putting the section on New Relic in the book, and I'm sure you aren't alone in being put off by it, as it's literally the first thing in the book. In the future I'd like to at least add some comparisons with a similar third-party service (DataDog). And maybe someone will point me at a secure method of doing this kind of low-level tracing/performance monitoring in production that is self-hosted. I hope you do check out the indexing section. If you haven't done much indexing with your models, then there's some great stuff in the chapter.
54.
 
1 point by bithive 6 months ago | 1 comment | parent | on: New Book: The Temple of Django Database Performance
I bought your book yesterday, thanks for the coupon! There is not much written about the topic, at least I hadn't found much I understood. Our baby was born 3.8 Month ago and decided that this night no one would get much sleep. Writing a book in this time well I imagen it challenging. The section about new relic put me off a bit. But maybe it's worth a look. I don't like 3rd party services. But that's just me. I hope I find some time at work to read the next chapter. Sounds promising. Never indexed any of my models...
55.
 
3 points by abrookins 6 months ago | 2 comments | parent | on: New Book: The Temple of Django Database Performance
Harder than I anticipated! At the same time, I was able to set my own writing schedule. I originally planned to publish the book during the summer, but decided to take three months off after our baby was born, which ended up moving the publication date later in the year. The entire project would have been a lot less stressful if I had simply told no one that I was working on it. However, as soon as I began writing I told everyone I knew about the book and the date that I anticipated publishing it. Then I took pre-orders based on that date. Next time, I will probably keep the project private longer. Or at the very least, avoid taking pre-orders and instead sell ‚Äúbeta‚ÄĚ access with a very loose publication date estimate.
56.
 
1 point by bithive 6 months ago | 3 comments | parent | on: New Book: The Temple of Django Database Performance
Hi, I hope your family is well! How was writing a book under this circumstances.
57.
 
2 points by abrookins 6 months ago | 4 comments | on: New Book: The Temple of Django Database Performance
Happy to answer any questions about the book, or about the process of writing a technical book! Summary version: it's a slog. And if cost is an issue for you, take 40% off with this coupon: 4pythonsc
58.
 
2 points by intrepidhero 6 months ago | discuss | on: Raise Better Exceptions in Python
Good point and well made. Does anyone have a good reference for best practices for using exceptions? I feel like usage in the wild, at least in my code base, is kind of all over the map. Sometimes they mean the program dies, sometimes they are more like a glorified return code. Sometimes they are base classes and sometimes subclasses. You can certainly do lots of cool things with them. I'd love to see a well reasoned treatment of how they *should* be used.
59.
 
-1 points by huynh 6 months, 1 week ago | discuss | parent | on: Flutter open-source
hi you
60.
 
-1 points by huynh 6 months, 1 week ago | 1 comment | parent | on: Flutter open-source
dumoa
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